Former B&Q boss moving up to head Co-op Group

Andover Advertiser: Euan Sutherland Euan Sutherland

THE Co-operative Group produced a surprise by naming a senior boss at Hampshirebased B&Q-owner Kingfisher as its next chief executive.

Euan Sutherland, chief operating officer at home improvements group Kingfisher – which owns Screwfix as well as DIY giant B&Q – had been seen as a possible successor to the FTSE 100 company’s chief executive Ian Cheshire.

Mr Sutherland, 43, will arrive at the Co-op in May, succeeding Peter Marks, who recently created the UK’s fifthlargest food retailer with the capture of supermarket Somerfield. Mr Sutherland is already a non-executive director for the group.

Co-op chairman Len Wardle said he had considerable experience of the “strategic leadership needed in complex customer- facing businesses”.

Mr Sutherland has been at Kingfisher since 2008, starting as chief executive of B&Q and Kingfisher UK before becoming group chief operating officer in February 2012 and joining the board in October.

He was previously chief executive of AS Watson UK, which owns retailer Superdrug, and has also worked at Boots, Dixons, Coca- Cola and Mars.

Mr Marks is retiring after 45 years within the Co-operative movement.

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3:20pm Thu 27 Dec 12

Paramjit Bahia says...

With past record full of butter flying winder how long Sutherland will stay loyal to Co-op, before smoothly sailing away to another prestigious and even higher paid job. Unlike outgoing Mr. Marks who spent most his life (45 years) serving the cause of Cooperative Movement.

Or could failing to produce/train top class management from within be the weakness of Cooperative Movement? If so then it is sad state of affairs and not exactly the best advert for it.
With past record full of butter flying winder how long Sutherland will stay loyal to Co-op, before smoothly sailing away to another prestigious and even higher paid job. Unlike outgoing Mr. Marks who spent most his life (45 years) serving the cause of Cooperative Movement. Or could failing to produce/train top class management from within be the weakness of Cooperative Movement? If so then it is sad state of affairs and not exactly the best advert for it. Paramjit Bahia
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