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Now showing at Odeon Andover Anton Mill Road,Andover,Hampshire SP10 2RW 0871 224 4007

  • Central Intelligence
  • Hail, Caesar!
  • Independence Day: Resurgence
  • Independence Day: Resurgence 3D
  • Me Before You
  • Me Before You (Subtitled)
  • My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2
  • Royal Opera Live: Werther
  • The Conjuring 2
  • The Secret Life Of Pets
  • The Secret Life Of Pets (Subtitled)
  • The Secret Life Of Pets 3D

Central Intelligence 3 stars

Calvin Joyner is a humble accountant, who married his sweetheart. Their high school reunion beckons and Calvin is reluctant to attend because he doesn't feel he has delivered on the promise of his formative years. Out of the blue, old classmate Robbie Weirdich gets in touch and the two men bond over a couple of drinks. It transpires that Robbie is a CIA agent, who may or may not be in possession of missile launch codes that are poised to be sold to a mysterious buyer.

  • GenreAction, Adventure, Comedy
  • CastAaron Paul, Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Amy Ryan, Danielle Nicolet.
  • DirectorRawson Marshall Thurber.
  • WriterDavid Stassen, Ike Barinholtz, Rawson Marshall Thurber.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration108 mins
  • Official sitewww.centralintelligencemovie.co.uk
  • Release01/07/2016

Calvin Joyner (Kevin Hart) was the golden boy of his high school in 1996, winning countless awards for his sporting prowess. In sharp contrast, overweight misfit Robbie Weirdicht (Dwayne Johnson) was bullied mercilessly by classmates and suffered the humiliation of being thrown naked into the gymnasium during the end of term student rally. Twenty years later, Calvin is a humble accountant, who has married his sweetheart, Maggie (Danielle Nicolet). Their high school reunion beckons and Calvin is reluctant to attend because he doesn't feel he has delivered on the promise of his formative years. Out of the blue, Robbie gets in touch with Calvin and the two men bond over a couple of drinks. It transpires that Robbie is a CIA agent, who may or may not be in possession of missile launch codes that are poised to be sold to a mysterious buyer (Thomas Kretschmann). Fellow CIA agent Pamela Harris (Amy Ryan) recruits Calvin because she believes that Robbie has gone rogue and is actually a terrorist known as the Black Badger. Torn between past and present, Calvin must work out if he can trust Robbie or if he is being used as a pawn in a deadly conspiracy.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

Hail, Caesar! 2 stars

Eddie Mannix masterminds production at Capitol Pictures, keeping the tawdry secrets of his leading men and ladies out of rival gossip columns penned by twins Thora and Thessaly Thacker. He also has to massage egos on and off the set of the studio's big budget epic, Hail, Caesar! - A Tale Of The Christ, starring matinee idol Baird Whitlock. When a Communist group calling itself The Future kidnaps Baird, Eddie races against time to pay the 100,000 US dollar ransom and keep the abduction secret.

  • GenreComedy, Drama, Musical
  • CastChanning Tatum, Scarlett Johansson, Tilda Swinton, Frances McDormand, Jonah Hill, Ralph Fiennes, Alden Ehrenreich, George Clooney, Josh Brolin.
  • DirectorJoel Coen, Ethan Coen.
  • WriterJoel Coen, Ethan Coen.
  • CountryUS/UK
  • Duration106 mins
  • Official sitewww.facebook.com/HailCaesarMovie
  • Release04/03/2016

When the mighty fall, they fall hard. Writer-directors Joel and Ethan Coen, who each have four Academy Awards on the mantelpiece and were nominees again this year for their script for Bridge Of Spies, descend from the filmmaking firmament with a sickening thud.

Hail, Caesar!, the brothers' screwball valentine to the golden age of 1950s Hollywood when studios nurtured, protected and controlled big name stars, is a deeply disappointing exercise in period style over substance, characterisation and wit.

It's hard to believe that the mercurial siblings who gave us The Big Lebowski, Fargo, O Brother, Where Art Thou? and No Country For Old Men could be responsible for this flimsy whimsy. Admittedly, there are a couple of stand-out musical sequences that quicken the pulse and remind us of the Coens' genius.

These crescendos are spliced and shoehorned into the film's trailer, which runs to a trim two and a half minutes, and is infinitely more enjoyable that the bloated 106-minute misfire that has been haphazardly bolted together in the editing room.

As usual, the ensemble cast shimmers with comic talent, but here, almost everyone is squandered in thinly sketched roles.

Eddie Mannix (Josh Brolin) masterminds production at Capitol Pictures, keeping the tawdry secrets of his leading men and ladies out of rival gossip columns penned by twins Thora and Thessaly Thacker (Tilda Swinton). He also has to massage egos on and off the set of the studio's big budget epic, Hail, Caesar! - A Tale Of The Christ, starring matinee idol Baird Whitlock (George Clooney).

When a Communist group calling itself The Future kidnaps Baird, Eddie races against time to pay the 100,000 US dollar ransom and keep the abduction secret from the filmmaking community. Meanwhile, Eddie must conceal the pregnancy of synchronised swimming actress DeeAnna Moran (Scarlett Johansson) and convince revered director Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes) to cast singing Western dreamboat Hobie Doyle (Alden Ehrenreich) in his romantic period drama.

"My readers don't care about Hobie Doyle - he wears chaps!" remarks Thora Thacker coldly. As the situation with Baird spirals out of control, Eddie calls upon the services of chain-smoking film editor CC Calhoun (Frances McDormand), agent Joseph Silverman (Jonah Hill) and tap-dancing leading man Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum).

Hail, Caesar! is depressingly light on laughs and the Coens' trademark eccentricities. The fleeting appearance of a sparkling one-liner - "God doesn't have children, He's a bachelor and He's very angry" - breaks up the mediocrity.

Some vignettes are stretched to the point of discomfort, such as Hobie's attempts to master one line of period dialogue ("Would that it were so simple"). Even the woefully underused Tatum is reduced to dancing for his proverbial supper in a tight-fitting sailor's outfit. Magic Mike XXL, all is forgiven.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Tuesday 28th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

Independence Day: Resurgence 2 stars

It has been 20 years since US President Thomas J Whitmore issued his rallying cry to repel alien invaders. Following the devastating showdown, the United Nations establishes a new early warning program named Earth Space Defense (ESD), which should alert us to future incursions by hostile extra-terrestrials. We are painfully unaware that the aliens from the initial attack sent a distress signal to the rest of their battalion before their defeat and more powerful aliens are poised to storm the planet.

  • GenreAction, Science Fiction, Thriller
  • CastBill Pullman, Jeff Goldblum, Maika Monroe, James Vanderbilt, Liam Hemsworth, William Fichtner, Travis Tope.
  • DirectorRoland Emmerich.
  • WriterNicolas Wright, James A Woods, Dean Devlin, Roland Emmerich.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration120 mins
  • Official sitewww.foxmovies.com/movies/independence-day-resurgence
  • Release23/06/2016

During the calm before the digital effects storm in Independence Day: Resurgence, Jeff Goldblum's quixotic scientist stares slack-jawed at an approaching alien mothership and gasps, "That's definitely bigger than the last one". Those words encapsulate the bombastic sequel to Roland Emmerich's 1996 sci-fi blockbuster, which famously blew up The White House as a symbol of extra-terrestrial hostility. Second time around, the German director isn't content with razing iconic buildings in Washington D.C. He deposits the whole of Dubai including the spearlike Burj Khalifa skyscraper on top of London, flattening landmarks with whooping abandon, then proceeds to pulverise America's eastern coast. Restraint isn't in the film's limited vocabulary and repeatedly, Emmerich and his army of special effects wizards conjure wanton destruction on a grand scale. With the benefit of this state-of-the-art trickery, eye-popping 3D and immersive sound, Independence Day: Resurgence should be a pulse-quickening thrill ride. So it comes as a crushing disappointment that the second film lacks the roughly hewn excitement and charm of its predecessor. Critically, the five scriptwriters have neglected to provide us with characters to care about before they unleash otherworldly hell upon the third rock from the sun. It has been 20 years since US President Thomas J Whitmore (Bill Pullman) issued his rallying cry to the entrenched human race. In the aftermath, survivors salvaged the remains of fallen alien technology to create hybrid weapons systems. We also initiated the Earth Space Defense (ESD) under the direction of David Levinson (Goldblum) as an early warning system against future incursions by hostile extra-terrestrials. On the eve of the July 4 celebrations, a hulking otherworldly destroyer enters our atmosphere in response to a distress call from the fallen fleet. Current US President Elizabeth Lanford (Sela Ward) commands elite pilots to take to the skies, including Dylan Hiller (Jessie Usher), orphaned pals Jake Morrison (Liam Hemsworth) and Charlie Miller (Travis Tope), whose parents perished during the failed first invasion and Chinese golden girl Rain (Angelababy). "It's the fourth of July," bellows Dylan as he spearheads the rebellion, "so show 'em some fireworks!" On the ground, Levinson searches for a scientific miracle aided by Whitmore's plucky daughter Patricia (Maika Monroe), French psychiatrist Dr Catherine Marceaux (Charlotte Gainsbourg), African warlord Dikembe Umbutu (Deobia Oparei) and Area 51 boffin Dr Brakish Okun (Brent Spiner), who suffers from the human-alien residual psychic condition. Independence Day: Resurgence lazily embraces disaster movie cliches including one mawkish subplot involving Levinson's father (Judd Hirsch), a school bus of stricken children and a dog. Performances struggle to make an impact above the din of pyrotechnics and a rumbustious orchestral score. Pivotal characters, who are clearly marked for death, serve their perfunctory purpose, blatantly teeing up a third instalment that will hopefully take another 20 years before it sees the flickering light of a cinema screen.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 26th June 2016
Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016
Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

Independence Day: Resurgence 3D 2 stars

It has been 20 years since US President Thomas J Whitmore issued his rallying cry to repel alien invaders. Following the devastating showdown, the United Nations establishes a new early warning program named Earth Space Defense (ESD), which should alert us to future incursions by hostile extra-terrestrials. We are painfully unaware that the aliens from the initial attack sent a distress signal to the rest of their battalion before their defeat and more powerful aliens are poised to storm the planet.

  • GenreAction, Science Fiction, Thriller
  • CastBill Pullman, Jeff Goldblum, Maika Monroe, Liam Hemsworth, William Fichtner, Travis Tope.
  • DirectorRoland Emmerich.
  • WriterNicolas Wright, James Vanderbilt, James A Woods, Dean Devlin, Roland Emmerich.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration120 mins
  • Official sitewww.foxmovies.com/movies/independence-day-resurgence
  • Release23/06/2016

During the calm before the digital effects storm in Independence Day: Resurgence, Jeff Goldblum's quixotic scientist stares slack-jawed at an approaching alien mothership and gasps, "That's definitely bigger than the last one". Those words encapsulate the bombastic sequel to Roland Emmerich's 1996 sci-fi blockbuster, which famously blew up The White House as a symbol of extra-terrestrial hostility. Second time around, the German director isn't content with razing iconic buildings in Washington D.C. He deposits the whole of Dubai including the spearlike Burj Khalifa skyscraper on top of London, flattening landmarks with whooping abandon, then proceeds to pulverise America's eastern coast. Restraint isn't in the film's limited vocabulary and repeatedly, Emmerich and his army of special effects wizards conjure wanton destruction on a grand scale. With the benefit of this state-of-the-art trickery, eye-popping 3D and immersive sound, Independence Day: Resurgence should be a pulse-quickening thrill ride. So it comes as a crushing disappointment that the second film lacks the roughly hewn excitement and charm of its predecessor. Critically, the five scriptwriters have neglected to provide us with characters to care about before they unleash otherworldly hell upon the third rock from the sun. It has been 20 years since US President Thomas J Whitmore (Bill Pullman) issued his rallying cry to the entrenched human race. In the aftermath, survivors salvaged the remains of fallen alien technology to create hybrid weapons systems. We also initiated the Earth Space Defense (ESD) under the direction of David Levinson (Goldblum) as an early warning system against future incursions by hostile extra-terrestrials. On the eve of the July 4 celebrations, a hulking otherworldly destroyer enters our atmosphere in response to a distress call from the fallen fleet. Current US President Elizabeth Lanford (Sela Ward) commands elite pilots to take to the skies, including Dylan Hiller (Jessie Usher), orphaned pals Jake Morrison (Liam Hemsworth) and Charlie Miller (Travis Tope), whose parents perished during the failed first invasion and Chinese golden girl Rain (Angelababy). "It's the fourth of July," bellows Dylan as he spearheads the rebellion, "so show 'em some fireworks!" On the ground, Levinson searches for a scientific miracle aided by Whitmore's plucky daughter Patricia (Maika Monroe), French psychiatrist Dr Catherine Marceaux (Charlotte Gainsbourg), African warlord Dikembe Umbutu (Deobia Oparei) and Area 51 boffin Dr Brakish Okun (Brent Spiner), who suffers from the human-alien residual psychic condition. Independence Day: Resurgence lazily embraces disaster movie cliches including one mawkish subplot involving Levinson's father (Judd Hirsch), a school bus of stricken children and a dog. Performances struggle to make an impact above the din of pyrotechnics and a rumbustious orchestral score. Pivotal characters, who are clearly marked for death, serve their perfunctory purpose, blatantly teeing up a third instalment that will hopefully take another 20 years before it sees the flickering light of a cinema screen.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 26th June 2016
Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016
Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

Me Before You 3 stars

William Traynor is a London playboy who harks from privileged stock. Fate deals him a cruel blow and William is left paralysed. He returns to his ancestral home and relinquishes his lust for life. In order to raise his spirits, Will's parents advertise for a carer and companion for their son and former tea shop waitress Louisa Clark answers the call. She buoys Will's spirits with a series of excursions. Friendship between the pair threatens to blossom into romance but Louisa already has a boyfriend.

  • GenreAdaptation, Drama, Romance
  • CastEmilia Clarke, Sam Claflin, Charles Dance, Vanessa Kirby.
  • DirectorThea Sharrock.
  • WriterJojo Moyes.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration110 mins
  • Official sitewww.mebeforeyoumovie.com
  • Release03/06/2016

Adapted from the bestselling novel by Jojo Moyes, Me Before You is a tear-stained romance about two lost souls, who find each other when they least expect it. The trajectory of this improbable love affair will be achingly familiar to anyone who has sobbed through The Fault In Our Eyes, Paper Towns and The Choice, and director Thea Sharrock clearly telegraphs each shameless tug of the heartstring. Moyes' screenplay adaptation omits some of the meatier content from her novel, like the heart-breaking reason her heroine is reluctant to leave home and explore the world. However, the crass depiction of class, which initially divides the characters, is still intact. Thus, the rich are carefree, fabulously attired and enjoy classical music and opera, while the working class are happily enslaved to denim and wouldn't know Brahms from Bartok. William Traynor (Sam Claflin) is a handsome high-flyer in London, who harks from privileged stock. His parents, Steven (Charles Dance) and Camilla (Janet McTeer), own a country pile including a crumbling castle and he jets off on expensive extreme sports holidays with his pretty girlfriend, Alicia (Vanessa Kirby). Fate deals William a cruel blow and he is left paralysed. He returns to his ancestral home and relinquishes his lust for life. In order to raise his spirits, the Traynors advertise for a companion for their son and misfit Louisa Clark (Emilia Clarke), who has just lost her job as a waitress at The Buttered Bun Cafe, answers the call. She lives in the nearby village with her unemployed father Bernard (Brendan Coyle), mother Josie (Samantha Spiro), sister Katrina (Jenna Coleman) and the rest of her extended family While hunky male nurse Nathan (Stephen Peacocke) tends to Will's physical needs, Louisa attempts to buoy his spirits with a series of excursions to the races and a classical music concert. An unlikely friendship threatens to blossom into romance, but Louisa already has a fitness-obsessed boyfriend, Patrick (Matthew Lewis). "You only get one life, Clark, and it's your responsibility to live it to the fullest," Will counsels Louisa, encouraging her to expand her horizons beyond the village and, indeed, Patrick. Me Before You glides serenely along its linear narrative. Fans of the book should snuffle through a couple of tissues as relationships unravel and good-looking cast members cry perfect tears in close-up. The morally complex issue of assisted suicide is broached in the most inoffensive and simplistic terms, offering one brief voice of dissent - "It's no better than murder!" - who is noticeably absent for the rest of the film. Despite the manifold failings of the script, luminous lead actors Clarke and Claflin kindle palpable sparks of on-screen chemistry that compel us to root for them, even when common sense tells us the relationship is destined to end in heartbreak.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 26th June 2016
Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016
Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

Me Before You (Subtitled) 3 stars

William Traynor is a London playboy who harks from privileged stock. Fate deals him a cruel blow and William is left paralysed. He returns to his ancestral home and relinquishes his lust for life. In order to raise his spirits, Will's parents advertise for a carer and companion for their son and former tea shop waitress Louisa Clark answers the call. She buoys Will's spirits with a series of excursions. Friendship between the pair threatens to blossom into romance but Louisa already has a boyfriend.

  • GenreAdaptation, Drama, Romance
  • CastCharles Dance, Vanessa Kirby, Emilia Clarke, Sam Claflin.
  • DirectorThea Sharrock.
  • WriterJojo Moyes.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration110 mins
  • Official sitewww.mebeforeyoumovie.com
  • Release03/06/2016

Adapted from the bestselling novel by Jojo Moyes, Me Before You is a tear-stained romance about two lost souls, who find each other when they least expect it. The trajectory of this improbable love affair will be achingly familiar to anyone who has sobbed through The Fault In Our Eyes, Paper Towns and The Choice, and director Thea Sharrock clearly telegraphs each shameless tug of the heartstring. Moyes' screenplay adaptation omits some of the meatier content from her novel, like the heart-breaking reason her heroine is reluctant to leave home and explore the world. However, the crass depiction of class, which initially divides the characters, is still intact. Thus, the rich are carefree, fabulously attired and enjoy classical music and opera, while the working class are happily enslaved to denim and wouldn't know Brahms from Bartok. William Traynor (Sam Claflin) is a handsome high-flyer in London, who harks from privileged stock. His parents, Steven (Charles Dance) and Camilla (Janet McTeer), own a country pile including a crumbling castle and he jets off on expensive extreme sports holidays with his pretty girlfriend, Alicia (Vanessa Kirby). Fate deals William a cruel blow and he is left paralysed. He returns to his ancestral home and relinquishes his lust for life. In order to raise his spirits, the Traynors advertise for a companion for their son and misfit Louisa Clark (Emilia Clarke), who has just lost her job as a waitress at The Buttered Bun Cafe, answers the call. She lives in the nearby village with her unemployed father Bernard (Brendan Coyle), mother Josie (Samantha Spiro), sister Katrina (Jenna Coleman) and the rest of her extended family While hunky male nurse Nathan (Stephen Peacocke) tends to Will's physical needs, Louisa attempts to buoy his spirits with a series of excursions to the races and a classical music concert. An unlikely friendship threatens to blossom into romance, but Louisa already has a fitness-obsessed boyfriend, Patrick (Matthew Lewis). "You only get one life, Clark, and it's your responsibility to live it to the fullest," Will counsels Louisa, encouraging her to expand her horizons beyond the village and, indeed, Patrick. Me Before You glides serenely along its linear narrative. Fans of the book should snuffle through a couple of tissues as relationships unravel and good-looking cast members cry perfect tears in close-up. The morally complex issue of assisted suicide is broached in the most inoffensive and simplistic terms, offering one brief voice of dissent - "It's no better than murder!" - who is noticeably absent for the rest of the film. Despite the manifold failings of the script, luminous lead actors Clarke and Claflin kindle palpable sparks of on-screen chemistry that compel us to root for them, even when common sense tells us the relationship is destined to end in heartbreak.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Tuesday 28th June 2016

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 3 stars

Married life has treated Fotoula Portokalos and Ian Miller well. They must now contend with a rebellious teenage daughter, Paris, whose actions are a constant source of concern for the rest of the dysfunctional clan. A long buried family secret finally slips out and Toula must rally all of her nearest and dearest to celebrate another blessed union at short notice.

  • GenreComedy, Drama, Romance
  • CastJohn Corbett, Michael Constantine, Nia Vardalos.
  • DirectorKirk Jones.
  • WriterNia Vardalos.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration94 mins
  • Official sitewww.mybigfatgreekweddingmovie.com
  • Release25/03/2016

Tottering down the aisle 14 years after My Big Fat Greek Wedding became the most successful romantic comedy of all time, Kirk Jones' sequel is like a batch of homemade baklava that has been left out too long and gone stale. Dry, flaky yet undeniably sweet, this second snapshot of daily life with the dysfunctional Portokalos family is studded with the same one-joke characters, who unite in adversity with fierce nationalistic pride. Screenwriter Nia Vardalos makes the second film to a similar recipe, flinging obstacles in the path of true love while various larger than life relatives excitedly offer their two drachmas worth of advice. Every exaggerated set piece is starved of belly laughs, from the family patriarch's repeated assertions that Greece gave birth to every modern invention - "The Greeks created Facebook - we called it the telephone" - to the nervous coming out of a gay character that feels like a non-event. Affection for the original film can only stretch so far and even at a trim 94 minutes, My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 feels needlessly padded. It seems like a lifetime since Greek-American singleton Fotoula Portokalos (Nia Vardalos) shocked her nearest and dearest by falling in love with non-Greek upper middle class beau, Ian Miller (John Corbett). They are happily married with a rebellious 17-year-old daughter, Paris (Elena Kampouris), who is applying to colleges on the other side of the country so she can wriggle free of her overly protective parents. Toula's father Gus (Michael Constantine) is convinced he is a direct descendant of Alexander The Great and begins to research the family tree. In the process, he uncovers a long buried family secret: his marriage certificate to sweetheart Maria (Lainie Kazan) wasn't signed by the priest so in the eyes of the law, they aren't husband and wife. "Who cares? We're married by time served," cackles Maria. Toula, her brother Nick (Louis Mandylor), cousins Nikki (Gia Carides) and Angelo (Joey Fatone), and interfering Aunt Voula (Andrea Martin) pledge their support to organising a wedding at short notice so Gus and Maria can tie the knot properly. Meanwhile Paris shrugs off Gus' suggestion that she needs to find a Greek husband as soon as possible and nervously prepares for a prom date with classmate Bennett (Alex Wolff). My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 is acrimoniously divorced from subtlety and invention. Jones' film goes through the motions with a depressing lack of urgency or purpose. Once again, Martin voraciously scene steals as the perfectly coiffed doyenne of fruity sexual advice. Vardalos drizzles on sticky sentiment at regular intervals in the vain hope that a few tears might flow in the absence of laughter. Even besotted fans of the blockbusting original will struggle to say, "I do".

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Tuesday 28th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

Royal Opera Live: Werther 3 stars

Joyce DiDonato and Vittorio Grigolo headline Benoit Jacquot's staging of Massenet's tragic love story, broadcast live from the Royal Opera House in London under the baton of conductor Antonio Pappano. Dutiful daughter Charlotte solemnly promises her mother on her deathbed that she will marry Albert. She carries through with the plan, denying rival suitor Werther a chance to woo her. They agree that separation will ease his pain and Werther agrees to travel but to keep in touch through his letters.

  • GenreDrama, Musical, Romance, Special
  • CastVittorio Grigolo, Joyce DiDonato, David Bizic, Heather Engebretson.
  • DirectorBenoit Jacquot.
  • WriterMassenet.
  • CountryUK
  • Duration190 mins
  • Official sitewww.roh.org.uk/cinemas
  • Release27/06/2016 (selected cinemas)

Joyce DiDonato and Vittorio Grigolo headline Benoit Jacquot's staging of Massenet's tragic love story, broadcast live from the Royal Opera House in London under the baton of conductor Antonio Pappano. Dutiful daughter Charlotte (DiDonato) solemnly promises her mother on her deathbed that she will marry Albert (David Bizic). She carries through with the plan, denying rival suitor Werther (Grigolo) a chance to woo her. They agree that separation will ease his pain and Werther agrees to travel but to keep in touch through his letters. Charlotte's marriage to Albert falls short of her expectations and she slowly falls in love with Werther through his correspondence. When Werther returns from his travels, Charlotte must make an agonising decision about where her future belongs.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 27th June 2016

The Conjuring 2 3 stars

Paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine have gone into self-imposed exile to recover - emotionally and spiritually - from their first brush with malevolent spirits. They are compelled to return to active duty by terrified single mother Peggy Hodgson, who claims that her house in north London is in the grip of a dark, invisible force. The Warrens travel to England and meet Peggy and her four daughters, who are clearly spooked by events in their home.

  • GenreHistorical/Period, Horror, Thriller
  • CastPatrick Wilson, Vera Farmiga, Madison Wolfe, Simon McBurney, Frances O'Connor.
  • DirectorJames Wan.
  • WriterChad Hayes, Carey Hayes, James Wan, David Johnson.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration134 mins
  • Official sitewww.theconjuring2.com
  • Release13/06/2016

Fact and outlandish fiction are repeatedly smudged in James Wan's stylish sequel to his 2013 supernatural horror, which dramatised one of the real-life cases of paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren. Like its predecessor, The Conjuring 2 juxtaposes archive photographs and the Warrens' taped interviews over the end credits to convince us that the spooky shenanigans orchestrated on screen are anchored in unsettling reality. Only the gullible would submit wholeheartedly to the film's gargantuan suspensions of belief. Subtlety often eludes Wan, like a blast on the soundtrack of London Calling by The Clash when the storyline moves to the capital, and he's rather fond of shooting impending doom from the point of view of an evil spirit creeping up on its victim. Artistic flourishes aside, the sequel draws inspiration from the notorious case of the Enfield poltergeist, which sent shivers down the spines of north Londoners in the late 1970s. To this day, the veracity of the haunting is shrouded in mystery. However, the four screenwriters of The Conjuring 2 are content to use one family's terror as a foundation for the usual array of horror tropes: creaking floorboards, a child speaking in tongues, inverted crosses, and ghostly figures emerging from the darkness. In 1976, Ed and Lorraine Warren (Patrick Wilson, Vera Farmiga) visit the Amityville house where Ronald DeFeo Jr was convicted of killing six members of his family. "This is as close to Hell as I ever want to get," sobs Lorraine after she enters a trance to relive the tragic night. The Warrens go into self-imposed exile to devote more time to their teenage daughter, Judy (Sterling Jerins). The church compels the Warrens to return to active service to investigate claims from a terrified single mother, Peggy Hodgson (Frances O'Connor), that her house in Enfield is in the grip of a dark force. Ed and Lorraine travel to rain-swept England to interview Peggy and her four children, Margaret (Lauren Esposito), Janet (Madison Wolfe), Billy (Benjamin Haigh) and Johnny (Patrick McAuley). When youngest daughter Janet exhibits signs of demonic possession, Ed and Lorraine battle with the lingering phantom of an old man (Bob Adrian) for the Hodgsons' souls. The Conjuring 2 feels overlong and lacks the tight emotional bond of the first film's besieged family. Wilson and Farmiga ease back into familiar roles while youngster Wolfe is impressive, including one unsettling scene of her character shuddering with fear beneath bedsheets as a spirit hovers above her. The script dissipates tension with occasional flecks of deadpan humour, like when two police constables witness a chair moving on its own around the Hodgson home and a WPC remarks, "This is a bit beyond us." It's certainly not beyond audiences, who enjoy gentle jump-out-of-their-seat scares as they nervously bite nails in the dark of a cinema.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 26th June 2016
Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016
Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

The Secret Life Of Pets 3 stars

Katie shares her Manhattan apartment with a terrier named Max, who relishes the close relationship with his owner. This special bond is threatened when Katie brings home a mongrel named Duke, who she has saved from a grim fate at the local dog pound. The two pooches are forced to put their rivalry to one side when a gang of abandoned pets led by a white rabbit named Snowball launches an intense campaign of revenge against contended owners and their pets.

  • GenreAnimation/Cartoon, Comedy, Family, Family
  • CastLake Bell, Jenny Slate, Ellie Kemper, Tara Strong, Louis CK, Albert Brooks, Kevin Hart.
  • DirectorChris Renaud, Yarrow Cheney.
  • WriterKen Daurio, Brian Lynch, Cinco Paul.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration91 mins
  • Official sitewww.thesecretlifeofpets.co.uk
  • Release24/06/2016

Creatures great and small wreak havoc on the streets of New York City in Chris Renaud and Yarrow Cheney's colourful computer-animated romp. Employing a similar framework to Toy Story, The Secret Life Of Pets imagines what our four-legged, feathered and finned friends get up to when our backs are turned, suggesting that the fun begins when we go to work or school. A Jack Russell terrier and an affection starved mongrel replace Woody and Buzz Lightyear as the feuding central characters, whose rivalry mellows into mutual affection when they are separated from their owner. Screenwriters Ken Daurio, Brian Lynch and Cinco Paul have great fun in early scenes, revealing how a dachshund uses his owner's food mixer as a back massager or one tiny dog performs acrobatic leaps to water a hanging basket with a cock of its leg. The central concept isn't original but there's an infectious charm to every shiny frame of Renaud and Cheney's well-groomed picture, which mercilessly exploits our affection for the critters that share our homes. Katie (voiced by Ellie Kemper) lives in her Manhattan apartment with a mischievous terrier named Max (Louis CK). "Our love is stronger than words or shoes," explains Max, referring to his penchant for chewing his owner's footwear when he was a puppy in training. He is good friends with other domesticated animals and birds including a pampered Eskimo dog named Gidget (Jenny Slate), who is head over fluffy tail in love with Max, and a sardonic house cat named Chloe (Lake Bell), who nurtures a healthy disdain for anything that doesn't enrich her selfish existence. "Dog people do weird, inexplicable things," she purrs, "like they get dogs instead of cats." Max's bond with Katie is threatened when his owner brings home a lolloping mongrel named Duke (Eric Stonestreet), who she has saved from the pound. Intense rivalry spills out onto the city streets where Max and Duke fall foul of a Sphynx cat called Ozone (Steve Coogan) and are mistaken for strays by animal control officers. The snarling enemies are rescued by a maniacal white rabbit named Snowball (Kevin Hart), who pressgangs them into service in his army of unwanted animals, who live in the sewers. The Secret Life Of Pets is the brainchild of the makers of Despicable Me and Minions, and retains a similar visual style and family-friendly sense of humour. Behavioural tics of each breed are mercilessly exploited for slapstick laughs and co-directors Renaud and Cheney maintain a brisk trot to ensure young audiences don't go for walkies in the middle of the film. The main feature is accompanied by a cute animated short entitled Mower Minions in which the gibberish-spouting sidekicks tend the lawn of elderly neighbours. Alas, the diminutive do-gooders are yellow fingers and thumbs, propagating plentiful guffaws and giggles.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 26th June 2016
Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016
Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

The Secret Life Of Pets (Subtitled) 3 stars

Katie shares her Manhattan apartment with a terrier named Max, who relishes the close relationship with his owner. This special bond is threatened when Katie brings home a mongrel named Duke, who she has saved from a grim fate at the local dog pound. The two pooches are forced to put their rivalry to one side when a gang of abandoned pets led by a white rabbit named Snowball launches an intense campaign of revenge against contended owners and their pets.

  • GenreAnimation/Cartoon, Comedy, Family, Family
  • CastTara Strong, Lake Bell, Jenny Slate, Louis CK, Ellie Kemper, Albert Brooks, Kevin Hart.
  • DirectorChris Renaud, Yarrow Cheney.
  • WriterCinco Paul, Ken Daurio, Brian Lynch.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration91 mins
  • Official sitewww.thesecretlifeofpets.co.uk
  • Release24/06/2016

Creatures great and small wreak havoc on the streets of New York City in Chris Renaud and Yarrow Cheney's colourful computer-animated romp. Employing a similar framework to Toy Story, The Secret Life Of Pets imagines what our four-legged, feathered and finned friends get up to when our backs are turned, suggesting that the fun begins when we go to work or school. A Jack Russell terrier and an affection starved mongrel replace Woody and Buzz Lightyear as the feuding central characters, whose rivalry mellows into mutual affection when they are separated from their owner. Screenwriters Ken Daurio, Brian Lynch and Cinco Paul have great fun in early scenes, revealing how a dachshund uses his owner's food mixer as a back massager or one tiny dog performs acrobatic leaps to water a hanging basket with a cock of its leg. The central concept isn't original but there's an infectious charm to every shiny frame of Renaud and Cheney's well-groomed picture, which mercilessly exploits our affection for the critters that share our homes. Katie (voiced by Ellie Kemper) lives in her Manhattan apartment with a mischievous terrier named Max (Louis CK). "Our love is stronger than words or shoes," explains Max, referring to his penchant for chewing his owner's footwear when he was a puppy in training. He is good friends with other domesticated animals and birds including a pampered Eskimo dog named Gidget (Jenny Slate), who is head over fluffy tail in love with Max, and a sardonic house cat named Chloe (Lake Bell), who nurtures a healthy disdain for anything that doesn't enrich her selfish existence. "Dog people do weird, inexplicable things," she purrs, "like they get dogs instead of cats." Max's bond with Katie is threatened when his owner brings home a lolloping mongrel named Duke (Eric Stonestreet), who she has saved from the pound. Intense rivalry spills out onto the city streets where Max and Duke fall foul of a Sphynx cat called Ozone (Steve Coogan) and are mistaken for strays by animal control officers. The snarling enemies are rescued by a maniacal white rabbit named Snowball (Kevin Hart), who pressgangs them into service in his army of unwanted animals, who live in the sewers. The Secret Life Of Pets is the brainchild of the makers of Despicable Me and Minions, and retains a similar visual style and family-friendly sense of humour. Behavioural tics of each breed are mercilessly exploited for slapstick laughs and co-directors Renaud and Cheney maintain a brisk trot to ensure young audiences don't go for walkies in the middle of the film. The main feature is accompanied by a cute animated short entitled Mower Minions in which the gibberish-spouting sidekicks tend the lawn of elderly neighbours. Alas, the diminutive do-gooders are yellow fingers and thumbs, propagating plentiful guffaws and giggles.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 26th June 2016

The Secret Life Of Pets 3D 3 stars

Katie shares her Manhattan apartment with a terrier named Max, who relishes the close relationship with his owner. This special bond is threatened when Katie brings home a mongrel named Duke, who she has saved from a grim fate at the local dog pound. The two pooches are forced to put their rivalry to one side when a gang of abandoned pets led by a white rabbit named Snowball launches an intense campaign of revenge against contended owners and their pets.

  • GenreAnimation/Cartoon, Comedy, Family, Family
  • CastTara Strong, Lake Bell, Jenny Slate, Louis CK, Ellie Kemper, Albert Brooks, Kevin Hart.
  • DirectorChris Renaud, Yarrow Cheney.
  • WriterCinco Paul, Ken Daurio, Brian Lynch.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration91 mins
  • Official sitewww.thesecretlifeofpets.co.uk
  • Release24/06/2016

Creatures great and small wreak havoc on the streets of New York City in Chris Renaud and Yarrow Cheney's colourful computer-animated romp. Employing a similar framework to Toy Story, The Secret Life Of Pets imagines what our four-legged, feathered and finned friends get up to when our backs are turned, suggesting that the fun begins when we go to work or school. A Jack Russell terrier and an affection starved mongrel replace Woody and Buzz Lightyear as the feuding central characters, whose rivalry mellows into mutual affection when they are separated from their owner. Screenwriters Ken Daurio, Brian Lynch and Cinco Paul have great fun in early scenes, revealing how a dachshund uses his owner's food mixer as a back massager or one tiny dog performs acrobatic leaps to water a hanging basket with a cock of its leg. The central concept isn't original but there's an infectious charm to every shiny frame of Renaud and Cheney's well-groomed picture, which mercilessly exploits our affection for the critters that share our homes. Katie (voiced by Ellie Kemper) lives in her Manhattan apartment with a mischievous terrier named Max (Louis CK). "Our love is stronger than words or shoes," explains Max, referring to his penchant for chewing his owner's footwear when he was a puppy in training. He is good friends with other domesticated animals and birds including a pampered Eskimo dog named Gidget (Jenny Slate), who is head over fluffy tail in love with Max, and a sardonic house cat named Chloe (Lake Bell), who nurtures a healthy disdain for anything that doesn't enrich her selfish existence. "Dog people do weird, inexplicable things," she purrs, "like they get dogs instead of cats." Max's bond with Katie is threatened when his owner brings home a lolloping mongrel named Duke (Eric Stonestreet), who she has saved from the pound. Intense rivalry spills out onto the city streets where Max and Duke fall foul of a Sphynx cat called Ozone (Steve Coogan) and are mistaken for strays by animal control officers. The snarling enemies are rescued by a maniacal white rabbit named Snowball (Kevin Hart), who pressgangs them into service in his army of unwanted animals, who live in the sewers. The Secret Life Of Pets is the brainchild of the makers of Despicable Me and Minions, and retains a similar visual style and family-friendly sense of humour. Behavioural tics of each breed are mercilessly exploited for slapstick laughs and co-directors Renaud and Cheney maintain a brisk trot to ensure young audiences don't go for walkies in the middle of the film. The main feature is accompanied by a cute animated short entitled Mower Minions in which the gibberish-spouting sidekicks tend the lawn of elderly neighbours. Alas, the diminutive do-gooders are yellow fingers and thumbs, propagating plentiful guffaws and giggles.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 26th June 2016
Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016