Andover United Reformed Church and 1st Andover Girls’ Brigade plants poppies for peace and remembrance

Juniors from 1st Andover GB planting poppy seeds

Explorers from 1st Andover GB planting poppy seeds

Explorers from 1st Andover GB planting poppy seeds

Explorers from 1st Andover GB planting poppy seeds

First published in News
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9th April 2014 Andover United Reformed Church and 1st Andover Girls’ Brigade plants poppies for peace and remembrance Girls from 1st Andover GB planted poppies of peace and remembrance on 9th April with the hope that they will bloom on or around 4 August, the 100 year commemoration of the declaration of the First World War.

United Reformed Churches across the three nations, along with churches from other denominations, have been planting both red and white poppy seeds throughout Holy Week. Red poppies have been used since just after the First World War as a symbol of remembrance for those who have died in war, whilst white poppies have come to be a symbol for peace and an end to all wars.

Marian Brewer, Group Leader of 1st Andover GB and member of Andover URC’s Leadership Group said: “The planting of both white and red poppy seeds offers an opportunity for members of the congregation and the girls to join together to actively remember those who lost their lives during the First World War, whilst contemplating Christ’s message of peace and justice and that there may come a time when the peace of Christ prevails and there is no more war.” The URC poppy planting initiative is just one of the ways in which the URC is commemorating the First World War. More information here.

Notes to editors The United Reformed Church was formed in 1972 and today comprises approximately 80,000 adults and 45,000 children in 1512 congregations. Its formation brought together English Presbyterians, English, Welsh and Scottish Congregationalists and members of the Churches of Christ. Worldwide, more than 80 million Christians are members of the Reformed family of churches, the largest Protestant tradition. The name “Reformed” is used because the churches emerged out of the reform movements of the sixteenth century. www.urc.org.uk Based on information supplied by Marian Brewer.

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