Press Association headlines

BANKRUPT QUANGO CHIEF STEPS DOWN

A businessman appointed by David Cameron to head a multibillion-pound quango has been forced to step down after it was disclosed that he was bankrupt.

A Government spokesman said Tony Caplin - a former Conservative Party chief operating officer - had resigned as chairman of the Public Works Loans Board (PWLB) which is responsible for £60 billion of loans in infrastructure projects.

The Mail on Sunday reported that Number 10 had been forced to act after an investigation it carried out revealed he had been made bankrupt in 2012.

(POLITICS Quango)

ARCHBISHOP TO HIGHLIGHT HARDSHIP

The Archbishop of Canterbury will use his Easter sermon to highlight the hardship of people suffering from conflict around the world and in Britain.

Speaking later today from Canterbury Cathedral, Archbishop Justin Welby will say: "In Syria mothers cry for their children and husbands. In the Ukraine neighbours cry because the future is precarious and dangerous. In Rwanda tears are still shed each day as the horror of genocide is remembered.

"In this country, even as the economy improves there is weeping in broken families, in people ashamed to seek help from food banks, or frightened by debt. Asylum seekers weep with loneliness and missing far away families. Mary continues to weep across the world."

(RELIGION Easter)

ROYALS ATTEND EASTER CHURCH SERVICE

Thousands of well-wishers turned out to see the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge mark Easter Sunday by attending a traditional church service in Sydney.

The couple arrived at St Andrew's Cathedral in the city centre and were greeted - as they have been throughout their tour of Australia - by officials and cheering crowds.

Kate looked immaculate in a stylish dove grey Alexander McQueen coat and Jane Taylor hat, while William was in a smart suit.

(ROYAL Tour)

CCTV 'USED TO SPY ON TEACHERS'

Schools are using CCTV cameras designed to keep pupils safe to spy on teachers, it has been claimed.

Teachers are being subjected to "permanent surveillance", with school leaders monitoring the footage and using it to make judgments about the performance of their staff, according to the NASUWT teaching union.

In many cases, teachers say they cannot turn off the cameras in their classroom, which are constantly recording lessons, a poll conducted by the union found.

(EDUCATION CCTV)

BEST OF ENGLAND IN HALL OF FAME

An exhibition showcasing the best of England, from the Beatles to Bakewell pudding, will open on St George's Day.

People planning to see The Hall of Fame exhibition at Observation Point on London's Southbank should perhaps hurry - it is open for only a week, from April 23 until April 30.

VisitEngland asked the public to submit their suggestions for the ultimate hall of fame in February, and the tourist board received almost 1,000 suggestions via their app. Submissions for inclusion in the free. open-air exhibition included fictional character Harry Potter and One Direction's Harry Styles as well as Earl Grey tea and Scotch.

(HERITAGE England)

72% BOOK HOLIDAYS WHILE AT WORK

Nearly two-thirds of workers book their holidays while in the office, according to research.

Nearly three-quarters (72%) of the 1,000 people polled researched their holiday options at work, while 63% booked a break in the office.

More than three-quarters (78%) admitted using office facilities to prepare for their holidays, with the printing of travel documents the most common use.

(INDUSTRY Holidays)

MOVE SPEND '£8,248 WITH STAMP DUTY'

Surging stamp duty costs have helped to push the average expense of moving home to £8,248, a report has found.

Collectively, UK home owners spent £6.6 billion on moving home last year, marking a 27% year-on-year increase on 2012 as a result of increased moving costs and growing numbers of house sales as the property market recovers, according to the research by Lloyds Bank.

Lloyds said rising house prices have pushed more property sales into higher stamp duty brackets. It said stamp duty costs, estate agency fees and legal fees have all grown by around 7% over the last year, while surveyors' fees and removal costs have remained broadly unchanged.

(MONEY Move)

CHURCH TO REOPEN AFTER FLOODING

A congregation will gather at their Somerset parish church for Easter Sunday today, the first service to be held there since massive floods devastated the area.

While Jesus spent 40 days in the wilderness, the parishioners of St Peter and St John's Church in Moorland have been unable to gather for worship for around 90 days.

Rector of Moorland, the Reverend Jane Haslam, said the church has been out of bounds since January as the village was first cut-off and then inundated itself.

(RELIGION Flooding)

PAIN THRESHOLD 'DECIDED BY GENES'

Four genes may help decide a person's pain threshold, research has shown.

Scientists studied the genes COMT, DRD2, DRD1, and OPRK1, in 2,721 people diagnosed with chronic pain.

Participants rated their perception of pain as "low", "moderate" or "high" on a scale from one to 10.

(HEALTH Pain)

MALIGNANT MELANOMA RATES INCREASE

Rates of malignant melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer, are five times higher in the UK than they were in the 1970s, new figures show.

More than 13,000 people are now developing the disease each year compared about 1,800 in 1975.

Incidence rate has shot up from just over three per 100,000 of the population 40 years ago to around 17 per 100,000.

(HEALTH Skin)

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